The Floating Exchange Project

Georgina is engaging audiences across the Asia Pacific with her ‘Floating Exchange Project’ launched in 2014 and set to finish in 2018.

The ‘Floating Exchange Project’ is a series of large scale, interactive installations that will be exhibited across countries in the Asia Pacific.

In each individual ‘Floating Exchange’, hundreds of hand-cast porcelain fish dangle delicately from antique silk thread overhead. The fish are created by the artist with the assistance of local artisans in the historical porcelain mecca of Jingdezhen, China  and are attached to a boat made by a tradesman local to the region of that particular exchange.

It makes for an ethereal and striking spectacle, so it is almost sad when Georgina invites her audience to cut away the fish and tie something (other than money) on the end of the empty thread in trade.

In this act, the artist encourages audiences to destroy and rebuild the installation and through this process, asks them to consider how their individual actions make up a larger whole. Over the course of the exhibition the installation is transformed. The manner of the transformation is entirely dependent on the decisions of the audience, by what they choose to leave behind when they take a fish.

This seminal work brings to light similar ideas of how we all individually impact on our natural world but also, perhaps more metaphorically, how we can also contribute to and shape our social environment with small, everyday actions.

The first ‘Floating Exchange’ happened in Brisbane in 2014 with the Project set to tour to countries such as Japan, China and Korea.

As the installations travel from one country to the next, the tokens of exchange left by audiences are framed and hung as a part of the next ‘Floating Exchange’. Georgina wanted to make this project a cultural exchange as much as a physical and intellectual one. She felt that “by giving audiences the opportunity to see what people from different countries within our region offer for their fish, they would see the scope of the project, and also have a sense of connectivity the other participants and see that we are part of something far greater than our immediate communities, cities and countries but part of a global community who are closer to us than we realise”.